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Our internship program lifts up and assists peoples’ ability to step into their own power.

The Collective Rising Internship, is a paid summer internship program that places undergraduate students at reproductive rights and social justice organizations around the country.

The Collective Rising Internship program, formerly known as the Reproductive Rights Activist Service Corps, defines reproductive rights, health, and justice broadly to include movements advocating for human rights, economic justice, racial equality, queer rights, immigrants’ rights, access to health services, and youth empowerment among others. Our partner organizations span the country and work with and for various communities. Since our program started in 1999, Collective Power has placed over 500 interns at more than 150 organizations.

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Jane Doe

Collective Rising Internship placements are substantive with interns participating in organizing, advocacy, direct service, community health, education, research, public policy and more.

All interns receive a $4,500 stipend and complete an intensive internship training at the annual Collective Power conference.

To be eligible for a Collective Rising Internship, you must:

  • be an undergraduate student at a US college/university including community and junior colleges
  • not be graduating in the Spring or Summer of the internship year
  • be returning to school Fall semester after the internship
  • be able to attend the annual Collective Power Conference for training.

**Note: At this time we are planning for an in-person conference for the 2022 program year, if we move to a virtual convening, attending remains a mandatory requirement**

ANNOUNCEMENT:

The application for the 2022 program year will be opening soon!

I’m deeply grateful for this opportunity. There is no way I would have been able to work at the Pride Center for a summer as an unpaid intern, so I am grateful to CLPP/RRASC for the support and training. And I am beyond grateful for the Pride Center for an amazing summer working with activists in Vermont’s rural queer community. I am leaving with a portfolio of work, an array of work experience and many connections that I will never forget.
Ellen Bryer ’14 COLLECTIVE RISING INTERN

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I am grateful for the support and training. And I am beyond grateful for the Pride Center for an amazing summer working with activists in Vermont’s rural queer community. I am leaving with a portfolio of work, an array of work experience and many connections that I will never forget.
Ellen Bryer ’14 COLLECTIVE RISING INTERN
  • No. Victims of Domestic Violence who are petitioners do not have to give up their guns. If, however, the Respondent files a DVPO against you and it is ordered by the Magistrate or Family Court, then you would have to give up your gun. If the Magistrate Orders the DVPO and you are a Respondent, you will have to surrender your guns. If the Sheriff holds your guns, you will need a Court Order from the Family Court to return the guns. This will only be Ordered when the Protection Order is no longer in effect. Sometimes guns will be held by a family member or close friend as a trustee. If this happens, they will have to promise not to make these guns available to you until you are allowed to lawfully possess them.

  • No. Victims of Domestic Violence who are petitioners do not have to give up their guns. If, however, the Respondent files a DVPO against you and it is ordered by the Magistrate or Family Court, then you would have to give up your gun. If the Magistrate Orders the DVPO and you are a Respondent, you will have to surrender your guns. If the Sheriff holds your guns, you will need a Court Order from the Family Court to return the guns. This will only be Ordered when the Protection Order is no longer in effect. Sometimes guns will be held by a family member or close friend as a trustee. If this happens, they will have to promise not to make these guns available to you until you are allowed to lawfully possess them.

  • No. Victims of Domestic Violence who are petitioners do not have to give up their guns. If, however, the Respondent files a DVPO against you and it is ordered by the Magistrate or Family Court, then you would have to give up your gun. If the Magistrate Orders the DVPO and you are a Respondent, you will have to surrender your guns. If the Sheriff holds your guns, you will need a Court Order from the Family Court to return the guns. This will only be Ordered when the Protection Order is no longer in effect. Sometimes guns will be held by a family member or close friend as a trustee. If this happens, they will have to promise not to make these guns available to you until you are allowed to lawfully possess them.

  • No. Victims of Domestic Violence who are petitioners do not have to give up their guns. If, however, the Respondent files a DVPO against you and it is ordered by the Magistrate or Family Court, then you would have to give up your gun. If the Magistrate Orders the DVPO and you are a Respondent, you will have to surrender your guns. If the Sheriff holds your guns, you will need a Court Order from the Family Court to return the guns. This will only be Ordered when the Protection Order is no longer in effect. Sometimes guns will be held by a family member or close friend as a trustee. If this happens, they will have to promise not to make these guns available to you until you are allowed to lawfully possess them.

2008 CLPP Conference

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Register for 2008 CLPP Conference

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